Stakeholders along the health care delivery chain are looking at advanced data analytics, or big data, for objective numerical insights on how to improve their clinical and financial performance. The growing interest from across the industry and across the world will push the global health care analytics market to between $18.7 billion to $31.8 billion or more within the next four to eight years, according to various estimates.

We culled through blog posts written by six McKesson health care analytics experts, seeking their best advice on how to make big data work for health care organizations. We identified eight useful tips from our six experts that executives can take back to their own health care organizations to help power big data as an effective performance-improvement strategy.

On Getting Started

How to Make Big Data Work for Health Care Organizations Graphic“The first step is to know what specific, measurable outcomes your organization is trying to achieve so your analysis will help drive those outcomes.”
Billie Whitehurst
From “Big Data Requires Big Focus

“Stop looking at Big Data unless you have `big focus.' An enterprise should have clear expectations aligned to its strategic objectives before investing in data analytics.”
Jason Williams
From “Big Data Requires Big Focus

On the Importance of Culture

“The challenge is building a culture that embraces data insights. The incentive to execute on day-to-day operations often trumps the true focus on data, but I see that changing as we move forward.”
Marcy Tatsch
From “Achieving Financial Health on the Road to Value-based Care

“Culture cannot be over-emphasized in becoming a data-driven organization.”
Jason Williams
From “Big Data Requires Big Focus

“Analytics offer insights into every area of your health system or hospital, informing decisions and guiding initiatives --when considered in the right context. It's tempting (and misleading) to skew results according to stated expectations. Eliminate bias by scrutinizing your data and approach. Remember that correlation isn't causation, and examine everything inside and outside of your organization that might affect data trends. Ask `How can we continue to improve?' rather than, `Are we achieving what we want?' Then, you can turn your data into meaningful, sustainable results.”
Pat Leonard
From “The Top Six Priorities for Hospital Success in 2016"

On Technology Solutions

“For analytics to become part of the hospital's daily operating procedures, you need solutions that are not heavily reliant on technical staff or data analysts and that can turn the data into actionable information.”
Marcy Tatsch
From “Achieving Financial Health on the Road to Value-based Care

“A hospital pharmacy's analytics will only be as effective as its source data. That's why it's important that IT platforms throughout its health system have electronic data exchange (EDI) functionality. In addition, the data that its organization gathers should be organized and formatted in a way that makes it easy for its cross-functional team to understand and to use.”
Yen Nguyen
From “Four Ways Hospital Pharmacies Can Leverage Data Analytics

“Data can provide actionable clinical and financial insights, and the marriage of the two through data analytics is powerful. That union can build collaborative relationships between oncology practices and payers over value-based care models. It can also build reciprocal relationships between practices and oncology drug manufacturers over research and clinical trials.”
Randy Hyun
From “Harnessing the Power of Oncology Data Analytics for Better Outcomes


About the author

McKesson editorial staff is committed to offering innovative approaches and insights so that our customers can get the most out of the health care solutions they have and identify areas for operational improvement, revenue growth and improved patient satisfaction. If you have a suggestion for a blog topic you’d like to see covered, let us know in the comments.