In the 2015 American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA) Relative Value Guide (RVG) pages Xii-Xiii, the ASA has added “Table 1: Current definitions (NO CHANGE) and Examples (NEW)” which provides examples of ASA Physical Status Classification System.¹

Examples of ASA 1 through ASA V are provided in the table below. Physical status is used to distinguish between various levels of complexity of the anesthesia service provided. Examples include, but are not limited to the following differences “well controlled DM / HTN supports ASA II vs. poorly controlled DM or HTN for ASA III and history (>3 months) of myocardial infarction (MI), cerebrovascular accident (CVA), transient ischemic attack (TIA), or coronary artery disease (CAD)/stent for ASA III vs. recent (<3 months) MI, CVA, TIA, or CAD/stents for ASA IV.

There is reference to “E” which indicates emergency surgery. An emergency exists when a delay in treatment of the patient would lead to a significant increase in the threat to life or body part.

The following is the Table referenced:

Coding ASA Physical Status

*The addition of “E” denotes Emergency surgery: (An emergency is defined as existing when delay in treatment of the patient would lead to a significant increase in the threat to life or body part)

For the full document, please see the ASA Relative Value Guide pg. xii-xiii, American Society of Anesthesiologist Standards & Guidelines.

¹ASA Relative Value Guide pg xii-xiii and ASA Physical Status Classification System (last approved by the ASA House of Delegates Oct. 15, 2014.

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About the author

Mary Jo Gross, CPC, CANPC of Compliance – Anesthesia and Pain Management, McKesson Business Performance Services